qualitative research industry

Mobile surveys, mobile qual look to explode in 2012: GRIT report

A sneak peek at the 2012 Greenbook Research Industry Trends (GRIT) report reveals an anticipation in the rise of mobile surveys this year.

That’s one of the highlights of a fascinating examination of what research firms anticipate and what clients see as the techniques that will drive market research budgets this year. The GRIT report, which will be published in the next few weeks, supports the idea that online communities and social media analytics will become a prominent and “mainstream” research technique, and research firms and clients both concur with that forecast.

Mobile surveys look to be at a tipping point. While actual use of mobile surveys in 2011 were around 20 percent (17 percent as reported by clients, and 24 percent as reported by research firms), expectations are much higher for usage in 2012. Fifty-three percent of clients expect to use mobile survey techniques, and 64 percent of research firms expect to do so.

Mobile survey usage may actually be underreported, according to the GRIT report, with budget that is actually going toward mobile being attributed to Computer Assisted Web Interviewing (CAWI) and Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI).

Mobile qualitative looks to undergo a big jump, as part of the shift toward mobile. With actual use somewhere around 13 percent in 2011, that number looks to accelerate upward in 2012. According to the report, 31 percent of clients, and 46 percent of research firms, expect to use mobile qualitative in 2012. 20|20 is at the forefront of this rise in mobile qualitative with the recent introduction of its second mobile qualitative application, QualBoard Mobile. QualBoard Mobile includes both a fully featured bulletin board access capability and an innovative new journaling application.

2012 Tech Predictions Impact Research

Happy New Year!

With the turning of the calendar and the sense of renewed optimism always brings a new wave of predictions.  As someone who enjoys thinking about the future, I find them interesting, and sometimes quite amusing.

So far, my favorite tech predictions are from VentureBeat.  This is my favorite so far because 1) I agree, and 2) the article is short enough to hold my attention.  The article is titled Five Tech Industry Predictions for 2012.  Though it doesn’t relate directly to the market research industry, there are many research implications.  Here are their 5 predictions:

  1. Social Media will lose its sizzle. Will we finally have rational discussion about our ability to conduct research via social media monitoring?
  2. The bubble will pop for the current crop of tech IPOs. Will this prediction hold true in research where M&A is more common than IPO?  We have seen a lot of M&A activity.  Will it slow and/or will values fall?  Frankly, I don’t think so.
  3. An explosion of the tablet market driven by sub-$100 tablets. WOW.  Think of the implications for online qualitative research if respondents can participate ANYwhere.
  4. Voice recognition goes mainstream. I’ve been thinking about this since I bought my iPhone 4S and got to know Siri.  She is a clever thing that I did not have to train.  If respondents can participate online without typing…..hmmmmmm…using their sub-$100 tablet maybe?
  5. “Cloudburst” shakes the tech industry.  Data security is the monster in the closet.  Can the market research industry take advantage of the “cloud” and secure its data properly?

Do you see additional trends?  How will they affect market research?

Welcome to 2012!

Year in Review: Most visited 20|20 research content of 2011

In addition to our three very popular eBooks published in 2012, 20|20 has been compiling a learning center full of white papers, case studies, a glossary and articles that are designed to provide research professionals resources to do better research. Here are the five most-visited links in our Learning Center in 2011. Beginner tips, a glossary of terms and case studies providing examples of other professionals doing research were at the top.

1. Qualitative Research Glossary
Our glossary is updated constantly and includes key qualitative research terms, from Interactive Voice Response (IVR) research to open-ended questions to chat room focus groups.

2. Case Study: GfK Healthcare and 20|20 Partner on Online Diary to Gauge Patients’ Feelings About Medication
To gain qualitative insights on why certain patients take their medication regularly and others do not, GfK Healthcare and 20|20 needed to develop a space where patients could honestly reveal their reasoning on their own terms. They used 20|20’s bulletin board focus group product QualBoard where each patient could express him or herself with a Flip video camera in an intimate, online diary setting. The project results were highly successful. Read on for a more in-depth look.

3. Using Online Qualitative Research Tools for Co-Creation
20|20’s online products QualBoard and QualLaborate can improve the co-creation process of developing new products with consumer input. By allowing you the space online to reach across cities and states to reach key consumers, the entire research process has better and more affordable access to your target consumer market. Check out the rest of 20|20’s break down to understand how online tools can aid your qualitative research initiatives.

4. Beginner Tips for Online Qualitative Research
It’s not always easy to transition from traditional qualitative research methods to online tools, but the benefits of merging the two can be enormous. Follow Betsy Hoag and Katerina Makatouni’s tips to excel at online qualitative research like a pro.

5. Case Study: Country Music Association Gleans Real-Time Event Feedback with Mobile Qualitative Research
The Country Music Association (CMA) Music Festival wanted qualitative research insights from the attendees, so they used 20|20’s mobile qualitative research platform QualAnywhere for a multi-day mobile focus group. The group was moderated through text messages and was able to record the attendees’ experiences as they occurred during the event. Read on for a look at the successful results!

Made your fall MR conference plans yet?

All my bags are packed, I’m ready to go…

With apologies to Peter, Paul & Mary… The Fall MR Conference season will be here before you know it. And it looks like another good one. Have you made your plans yet?

20|20 will be exhibiting at several this Fall… and attending even more.

The folks at Inside Research have put together the best annual conference calendar in the industry and made it available on their website.

You might want to bookmark this page, as I’m sure they’ll be updating it for the Spring in the not-too-distant future.

One note: the ESOMAR 3-D Digital Research Conference has been moved and is now scheduled for October 26-28 in Miami.

The taxi’s waiting, he’s blowin’ his horn…

The Storyline at the QRCA Symposium

Thursday, QRCA hosted their biennial QRCA Symposium featuring researchers and their clients presenting actual research projects, complete with impact on the business.  It was a great “feel good” day for consultants who sometimes wonder if their work makes much of a difference at the decision-makers level.

The common thread running through the presentations was the need to develop the customer’s story.  From Patricia Martin’s story about the Renaissance Generation to AARPs presentation on reaching the Millennial Generation, presenters focused on the importance of the story.  To fully engage their customers, marketers must understand them holistically.  They must understand their “story,” not just their impression of the product.

Qualitative researchers and qualitative techniques are uniquely qualified to explore and reveal the customer’s story. We have more qualitative techniques than ever before.  Presenters uncovered stories using traditional focus group methodologies and online qualitative research methodologies.  The techniques are simply tools that we match to the need to provide the richest and most revealing stories.

Out of the story come the deep insights into the “why.”  In conference after conference, research buyers say they want insights.  They want more than just regurgitation of the facts or the research events.  They want insights that inform decisions.  These insights don’t come from a cursory glance; they come from a focused experience that reveals the customer’s story with all the twists, turns and inconsistencies that makes us human.

The 2011 QRCA Symposium told a lot of stories that informed a lot of decisions that improved a lot of products/services that improved a lot of lives.  It was a good day.

Change in the Qualitative Research Industry

The following post is from Jim Bryson reporting from Day 2 of The Market Research Event:

Dan Heath gave a great presentation today at IIR’s The Market Research Event on implementing change in organizations. Dan is the author of Switch.

In proportion, Dan compares the rational brain and the emotional brain to a rider on an elephant. The rational rider thinks he is in control but ultimately, the elephant wins any disagreement. Therefore, to achieve change, one must:

  • Give the rational brain a reason to change and a direction for change. This is our typical business approach. We typically expect people to (1) analyze, (2) think and (3) change. But this simply doesn’t work because it ignores the emotional elephant.
  • Motivate the emotional brain. The mental model is (1) see, (2) feel and (3) change. For example, the FDA food labels would be more effective if, rather than listing the percentage of saturated and unsaturated fat, it read, “this product will make you fat.” This would actually stimulate change because it creates an emotional response.
  • Shape the environment. The shape of the environment encourages certain behaviors. Therefore, to promote change, create an environment that promotes the change you want.

So how does this apply to the qualitative research industry? Organizations are in a constant state of change and research is often conducted to direct and/or justify change. As researchers, we often know what change needs to happen, but we often justify it through numbers and then get frustrated when change doesn’t occur. We need to take the responsibility to encourage change through emotional and environmental as well as rational methods.

Maine law restricts research with minors

MRA released a warning about a new Maine law that restricts information that can be passed from one company to another regarding minors.  The law could severly limit the ability of bona fide research companies to conduct research among consumers under 18.

Here is part of the MRA press release.  There is also a video link explaining the law.

As CMOR explained in their August Legislative Update, Maine’s LD 1183, the Prevent Predatory Marketing Practices Against Minors Act, prohibits the sale, offer for sale or transfer of health-related or personal information about a minor if that information is personally identifiable, was collected for marketing purposes without verifiable parental consent or will be used for “predatory marketing” purposes. The law came into effect on September 12, 2009.

“Researchers everywhere should check their data sets and research plans to ensure they comply with the strictures of this new law. Although the Maine Attorney General has said she will not enforce the law, any violator is still potentially open to private civil suits, including those sharing data between companies as part of the research process,” said LaToya Lang, Counsel for CMOR.

The full press release and a video link can be found at: http://www.mra-net.org/news/article.cfm?aID=693  

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